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against her will. and no one will tell her why. >>> i'm don lemon, thanks for joining us. midwest where the flooding in flood waters have forced 1,000 people from their home. the water is still surging even though the rain has stopped. there it is right there. this is the scene out of minnesota. that is the cannon river canal and the water is still climbing as we speak. one of the rivers is supposed to crest during the hour here. we're joined now by skype. tell us what you're seeing. >> we're seeing a wisconsin river the highest it's ever been since 1938. the water levels are about three feet from the back door of our house. we are hoping that the river has crested at this point, although we have at least a couple of watchful hours to make sure that everything holds. >> so tim, this is your front porch. is your home in any danger right now? >> our understanding is that our home was here the last time the river flooded in 1938, so we're keeping our fingers crossed and hoping that it's safe. there are about a half dozen homes in this neighborhood that have already flooded. downstream in
'll tell us why and what he's doing about it. >>> you've been telling us who your heroes are, thousands of you. now we'll reveal the top ten cnn heroes of the year for the first time right here this hour on cnn. >>> first if you want to make a republican smile, mention the year 1994. that year is midterm elections coming halfway through the first term of a democratic president, bill clinton, republicans picked up 54 house seats and 8 senate seats. more than enough to win control of both houses of congress. 16 years later, we are halfway through the first term of a democratic president, a different one now with the democratic majority in congress and republicans aren't the only ones making comparisons and predictions and promises. this morning, the house republican leadership rolled out its pledge to america. a longer and less specific version of 1994's contract with america. the setting was a lumber company in northern virginia, the key points are these. a halt to any stimulus spending that hasn't gone out yet. and a rollback of overall spending to prestimulus, prebailout levels. repeal
export. obviously we import a lot more than we export. well, the u.s. trade deficit dropped sharply last month. again, unexpectedly. due largely to the fact that we are exporting record numbers of goods and i'll tell you about that in a second. these are two very, very important parts of our economy which indicate, well, maybe things aren't all that bad. maybe people aren't, things aren't as bad as some people will have you believe. >>> now i want to tell you about four bright spots in the economy right now. one of them, i said we're exporting a lot. one of the things we're exporting a lot of are farming products. things that we farm here in america. and largely that's because there are developing economies like brazil and china, who are buying more of what we export. in fact, china is set now to become the second-biggest buyer of things that produced on american farms. the biggest buyer, he for your information, is canada. number two, mergers and acquisitions, we've been talking about this. you may have heard about it. we don't talk about it all the that much on cnn. but companies are b
up, what are we going to do, give up, stop fighting? >> thank you for joining us today. we're hoping you connect to us on twitter. we do read every single one of the messages you post there or on facebook. make sure you join us every week for "your money" saturdays and sundays. you can log on to have a great weekend. >>> seven steps to saving money, we start your home from your thermostat to your dishwasher. >>> a mirror mission goes viral. now in the running to become the most popular video in the world. we'll show you our other contenders in our 3:00 p.m. hour. >>> changes in health care went into effect this week. coming up we'll tell you how those changes could impact your next doctor's visit. you're in the cnn newsroom, where the news unfolds live this saturday. >>> up first, national security and the case of a yemeni american cleric by the name of anwar al aawaki. he's suing to prevent the u.s. government from targeting awlaki. he's been linked to al qaeda. the u.s. believes he's hiding in yemen. chris lawrence has been following all of this from washington. what
'm suzanne malvo. join us weekdays in the "situation room" from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. eastern and this time every weekend on cnn international. the news continues next on c nchcnn. >>> where is the self-professed mastermind of 9/11? are we any closer to capturing him? the owhere abouts of osama bin laden. >>> their homes blew up around them shattering lives and possessions. they're looking for answers an i don't, the death toll could rise from the devastating gas explosion in california. the neighborhood that looks like a war zone. >>> and the city of juarez, mexico, is a real war zone and the children are not immune. the drastic measures to keep children alive in the murder capital of the world. >>> good evening. i'm 9/11. nine years later at ground zero in new york, at the pentagon and atie a quiet field in pennsylvania, solemn ceremonies marked the day hijackers took control of four airlines and took aim at america'sd politic and financial capitals. the nation has changed in so many ways. some changes obvious and others, more subtle. today's speakers reminded all of us of what hadn't changed
for what you're doing. >> thanks. >> that's all of the time that we have today. i'm wolf blitzer. join us weekdays in "the situation room" 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. eastern every saturday at 6:00 p.m. eastern right here at cnn, and at that time, every weekend on cnn international. the news continues next on cnn. >>> hello, everyone i'm don lemon. thank you so much for joining us. tonight, we're going to devote the better part of this hour to a discussion about the controversy swirling around bishop eddie long. among those joinings tonight ted hag art a man who faced his own sexual scandal while still a minister. there he is live. he'll join us in just a bit but first 60 seconds catch you up on today's top stories. >>> the torrential rains in the upper midwest are gone but the water left behind is causing big problems. thursday's downpours have told a week end of cresting creeks and rivers in parts of minnesota and wisconsin. no reports of deaths or injuries though but flooding is expected to last through the weekend. >>> the obama administration is asking a court to dismiss a lawsuit filed on beh
't afford the internet. you have free internet. you can teach them how to use the internet for educational purposes. >> they have wonderful videos. >> they've got dvds, they've got video, all kinds of educational trips. want to go to italy? rent the video for a whole week. it's actually a very wonderful resource. >> ask a young child in india what they want to be, they say a software engineer. ask the kids in america, they want to be a star. >> don't forget to tune in at 1:00 p.m. and tomorrow at 3k to all a ali velshi. -- captions by vitac -- >>> people on this saturday morning waking up to severe west. the governors in minnesota and wisconsin declaring states of emergency. >>> plus 38 days from midterm elections and 38 days and two years from the 2012 presidential election. we're going to tell you who's headed there today. from the cnn center, this is "cnn saturday morning." good morning to you all. i'm joe griffin in for t.j. this morning. thanks for starting your day with us. >>> also coming up in the next 90 minutes, these stories. the fbi raiding many groups in the midw
>>> well, that's going to do it for us. >> thanks for joining us. "cnn newsroom" starts right now with kyra phillips. good morning. >> good morning here's what we're working on this morning. >> i thought equality was no non-negotiable. >> the call for action. is it enough to sway two republican senators on don't ask, don't tell? >>> the fda debates genetically altered salmon. could it be safe? a top food expert weighs in. >>> the president awards the highest military honor to this man that made the ultimate sacrifice for fellow comrades. you'll hear his story from the men that respect him most. i'm kyra phillips. you are live in "the cnn newsroom." >>> first, just learning now that a helicopter that crashed in afghan was carrying nine american troops. we don't have specifics as to what exactly happened but we're told that enemy fire has been ruled out as a possible cause. today's casualties make this year the deadliest so far for the war in afghanistan. more than 500 coalition troops have been killed. we're going to continue to monitor this story an bring you updates as soon as we
, regardless of what his motives are, newark, new jersey can really use the 100 million shot in the arm. newark public schools are in a lot of trouble. it is new jersey's largest school district. over 40,000 students and it was taken over by the state in 1995. the headline of today's newark star ledger says is this really the way to fix newark schools. let's bring in the editor of the editorial page. tom, i'm sorry. thank you for joining us. >> glad to be here. >> first of all, are you -- where do you stand on this issue of whether this is pr or a good thing? >> i don't think anybody in newark cares whether he is or not. this is not only 100 million, it's a challenge grant. we're hoping for 200 million. that will be a big help. >> the newspaper says, is this really the right thing. what's that to promote? >> most i'm talking to are overjoyed about this. newark at this point, spends a billion dollars a year. this will be over four years. that's $20 million a year on top of a billion. it's not revolutionary in terms of the money. more charter schools. weakening tenure performance. merit pay for g
. join us every week for your money. also logon to -- captions by vitac -- >>> on ts ninth anniversary of from heightened emotio ground zero to the proposed sight of the islamic center. and ahead at 3:00 eastern time, a closer look at that deadly pipeline explosion in california outside san francisco. could something like that happen where you live? and at 4:00, another perspective on the islamic center. we'll talk to jurrjensists fra sweden, south africa as well as israel. in that straight ead here the news room. the ninth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks had arrived with sorrow and with debate. the deadliest acts of terrorism in the u.s. history was remembered this morningith memorial services in york, washington as well as pennsylvania. but the focus has shifted this an rnoon to plans now for islamic center nea the sight of the new york attack. a march in suort of the center started at the top of the hour and we understand a protest is also about to get underway. let's begin with ssan candiotti. >> reporter: at this hour, both sides are starting
trade center and the u.s. pentagon. on this grim aniversary, susan candiottiis at the site in new york city, and let's get started in new york where the deadliest attack took place more than 2,700 people were killed at the world trade center, cnn's national correspondent susan candiotti attended today's memori services at ground zero. she's still there now. susan? >> reporter: hi, fred. as this is winding down, you know, every year this is a mixture of pain and pride. pain, of course, shared by the famiesli of tososs who are lost that day and the collective pain of a nation, but there is also pride. pride and shared memories of loved ones, pride in what they accomplished pride in what this country stands for. also there is pride in what is taking place now, what is taking shape at ground zero. that i particularhis year the 9/11 memorial. family members for the very first time werescorted by people who are active involved alin putting t hat memorial together. so, for example, they are seeing the outlines of the reflecting pools that are taking shape. they also saw the 16 swamp oak esee
for us down there, >> reporter: i think as things wind down or certainly as the city wakes up, you are seeing more and more people who are in this area, people who obviously have made a conscious decision to want to be as close as they can to the ceremony. so you are seeing not only family members who attend theer ceremony being here and some who are escorted in but other relatives who come from the area who come in on their own to attend the ceremony every year. we are also hearing church bells ringing as they have throughout the morning during various points of the ceremony as well. that adds to the emotion of the moment. we also talked to police commissioner, ray kelly, about this morning. he told me, new yorkers, in particular, are very resilient. y, they feel the pain of what happened and every day, he also said, it is in the back of everyone's mind what happened on that fateful day. people here remain mindful that something might happen again. he said in the future but he insisted that new yorkers are ready for whatever might lie ahead. certain certainly, the city has ta
for that news conference to begin. jim, if you would, give us a sense of the scene at this hour? >> reporter: sure, here at the command center for the fire, people are apprehensive for the weather today. yesterday a firefighters called it a gift, cool and humid. today, not so lucky. dry and a real chance winds could pick up later this afternoon. they are trying to make progress and try to contain it before it happens. several subdivisions opening to areas evacuated but not burned. the real heart of the fire, people not allowed back. people are restless but authorities don't want anybody up there until they feel it's safe. >> any word on the unaccounted for and how they will search for them? >> reporter: searching is difficult because people evacuated from the canyons, staying with friends and families, staying in hotels and around the evacuated area. they are optimistic that nobody has actually been hurt and people have gone off with family and haven't checked in but it's going to be difficult. these houses that have burned, it's just the foundation that's left. >> give us a heads up when th
? >> they told us nothing. i mean, i don't know how anybody cannot repair a smell like that. and not find that smell. especially going to neighborhoods -- there's other neighborhoods that have smelled the same smell, really strong. >> reporter: and for how long have you smelled this? >> for a good three weeks. >> reporter: what did they tell you to do? >> when the head came out, they said shut the door and go inside the house and that was it. and you can see, what happened. it's just ridiculous. >> reporter: now, this morning pg & e did acknowledge that they're aware of this gentleman's accusations, and they say they're poring over their records to see if they were in this neighborhood. but again, ali, still there is a search going on for potential victims here. and until that work is done, pg & e says they can't get close enough to the pipe to really analyze it. >> natural gas is infused with a smell. so the idea is that people should be able to smell it. it's not the natural smell of the gas. they put that in there so when there is a leak and people describe it, the gas company should k
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14